Encyclopedia J

Jackson Hall:
2059 Jackson Avenue (Original called the Hagan’s Hall also known as Langshoremen’s Hal.

Jane alley:
This picture was made of the house of Louis Armstrong just before it was torn down in June 1964. Louis was born at August 4, 1901 in Jane Alley (and not as he stated in James Alley). It was a little alley, only one block long, between Gravier and Perdido Streets.

Jackson Hall:
2059 Jackson Avenue (Original called the Hagan’s Hall also known as Langshoremen’s Hal.

Jane alley:
This picture was made of the house of Louis Armstrong just before it was torn down in June 1964. Louis was born at August 4, 1901 in Jane Alley (and not as he stated in James Alley). It was a little alley, only one block long, between Gravier and Perdido Streets.

Jefferson City Buzzards:
Jefferson City BuzzardsThe Jefferson City Buzzards group is the oldest (and first) marching club in New orleans Mardi Gras. It was organized in 1890. The Buzzards, as the neighborhood folk refer to them, feature an all-male membership.
Friendly with doubloons, long beads, and kisses, the revelers enjoy entertaining themselves by one of their well-known pranks: lying on their backs in the street and quivering their arms and legs in the air like dying cockroaches in front of traffic, hollering “cockroach.”
The Jefferson City Buzzards begin marching Mardi Gras morning around 6:45am at Exposition Blvd. and Laurel St. Uptown. The club walks down Laurel to Webster hanging a right to Tchoupitoulas down Tchoupitoulas to Arabella, then to Magazine, to St. Charles Avenue down to Canal St., preceding Rex. The route proceeds to Rampart St. then takes a u-turn to end at Magazine and Poydras streets. The Buzzards handout and toss emblem doubloons, collector’s items.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jefferson_City_Buzzards

First, the Jefferson City Buzzards. Jefferson City was once a part of New Orleans. Jefferson City ran along Mississippi River from Toledano to Joseph Street. This part of town, back in the mid- and late-1800s, was heavily inhabited by immigrants. Many of these immigrants were German and many of these Germans were butchers. These butchers slaughtered meat to be consumed in the city. And with slaughterhouses and butchers came . . . buzzards.
So, 20 years after Jefferson City became part of New Orleans proper, in 1890, the Jefferson City Buzzards began marching. They began marching when it was popular to dress as women; some of the marchers still do this today. They have been marching now for over 115 years. So when one of the marchers drops to the ground and starts doings his famous “cockroach dance,” enjoy a bit of history in the living. http://www.nolanotes.com/2008/03/14/buzzards-and-babies-and-cabbage-oh-my/

Jeunes Amis Hall:
North Robertson Street.
Societe des Jeunes Amis Hall
– Recording place of Creole George Guesnon’s New Orleans Band, 1962
Johnson park:
The park opened in 1902 and was use for only around seven years.5,p59

Joe Rice’s Cafe:
a cabaret at the corner of Marais and Iberville streets, in the years after 1910.
Manuel Perez frequently worked at Joe’s place.